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Setting Up Shop: Table Saw Upgrade Part 2

Posted by on July 21st, 2014

“Let’s start over.”

That’s what I said to myself a couple of days ago.  In case you missed it, I built the top to my table saw work station out of 2x4s.  I was planning on building the rest of it out of 2x4s too and while I was reasonably satisfied with the results so far, I DID run into some warped and twisted boards.  That’s going to happen when you work with framing lumber.  It’s just the way it is.  It’s not intended for tight tolerances or fine furniture.  It’s for framing houses, which is why it’s called framing lumber.

The same day I published last week’s post I got an email from one of our awesome subscribers, Rick.  I could tell right away Rick knows his stuff.  Rick was honest, experienced and suggested I not use 2x4s for this project since my intention is to make a fairly accurate table saw station.  Accurate cuts are obviously important and having a table top made from 2x4s doesn’t help.  Rick suggested I use planed and cut hardwood boards instead.  Planed hardwood boards, like maple or oak, will be much more stable and less prone to warping or twisting and will therefore provide a much higher quality product.

As soon as I read Rick’s email, I knew he was right, but I dithered.  I was telling myself that I already spent around $20 on 2x4s and I’m sure it would turn out okay.  I was lying to myself.  I kindly replied to Rick that he was right, but I had already purchased a whopping $20 worth of wood and I didn’t want to invest in the hardwood upgrade.

I’m also stubborn.

After thinking about it for a few days, I realized that I MIGHT actually have enough leftover plywood from some previous projects that I could build the entire table over again.  After all, I had only built the top and it probably only took me an hour.  I checked my inventory (my giant pile of scraps on the basement floor) and sure enough, I had enough for maybe 80% of the table.  Okay.  I could do this.

Let’s start over.

If you’re not a regular woodworker or are just getting into this sort of  thing, plywood is actually more dimensionally stable then hardwood and MUCH more stable than 2x4s or framing lumber.  The reason is it’s a board made from thinner laminations of hardwood where the grain alternates directions from one layer to the next.  Consequently, it’s much less likely to suffer from twists, cups or any of those annoying features that is common in framing lumber.  Plywood is perfect for shelves, cabinets and all sorts of carpentry projects where stability is important (like my garage shoe organizer).   It’s also cheaper than hardwood.  Not quite as pretty, but cheaper.

So big thank you to Rick for reminding me that it was worth taking the time to do this project correctly.  I owe you a beer.

Anyway, I re-built the top out of plywood.  You probably can’t tell from the photo, but it’s a much better product.

table saw workbench 2

This is pretty much where we left off last time.  I then cut out the melamine for the work surface.  The open area is where the table saw will be located.  I didn’t permanently install the melamine yet since it would just get in the way during the rest of the build.

table saw workbench 1

Now for the legs.  Just a couple of plywood boards with pocket screws.

table saw work bench legs

I topped them off with a couple of small plywood pieces for the wheels.

table saw work table legs wheels

Flipping it back over, I threw on some cross braces, which is where the table saw will ultimately be located.

table saw workbench 3

That’s it for this post.  In our next post I’ll finish the build and setup the fence.

Ever start a project over after realizing you could’ve done better?  Leave a comment below and explain yourself.  

 

Posted in Carpentry,DIY Projects. Tagged in ,, , ,

Setting Up Shop: Table Saw Upgrade #1

Posted by on July 13th, 2014

If you’ve been following along lately, you know that we’re knee deep in our home office renovation.  In our last post, we discussed the work we’ve done to date and what work was coming soon.  We’re starting the second half our office project today by upgrading my main workshop power tool, the table saw.  For what it’s worth, you can expect a lot of workshop posts and videos in the coming weeks.

Here’s my current table saw, a Hitachi.

hitachi table saw

What I like about it… It’s a great table saw.  It’s powerful, it’s lightweight, portable and it’s perfect for most DIY projects.  (By the way, on our Tool Recommendations Page, I recommend the Bosch model instead since it permits dado blades, whereas the Hitachi does not.  So, if you are in the market for your first table saw, consider the Bosch over the Hitachi.)

Now for what I don’t like about this saw and frankly, contractor saws in general.  It’s not such a great cabinet saw, which means it’s not ideal for cutting big plywood sheets.  It’s a bit undersized, so larger pieces of plywood tend to be more of a challenge than I’d like.  The table will move or wobble slightly when I place a larger sheet of wood down on it and it doesn’t have much of an outfeed setup.  For long pieces of wood I have to walk around the back of the saw and pull the piece through once it starts hanging off the back.  I’m sure that’s pretty common for people who use these types of saws, but it’s not ideal nor is it very safe, folks.  It also only allows cuts up to around 24″ or so, which also isn’t great for wide cabinet parts.

While I’d love to buy a full blown cabinet saw, those are pretty pricey and would really only be worth my investment if I opened up a cabinet shop (not interested).  Here’s an example of what a cabinet saw looks like:

grizzly table saw

This is a Grizzly brand table saw (affiliate link).  Now THIS is a cabinet saw.  You can click the link to see how much it costs, but it’s close to $2k.  My hitachi was around $300.  Yeah.  Not interest in spending that sorta dough.  Eventually, I plan on buying one way down the road, but I’m not in any hurry.  These saws have powerful motors and huge table tops.  They are VERY heavy and don’t move a lick when you slap a board down on them.

So what to do?  Well, I’ve decided to make a sort of hybrid table saw station similar to something I saw on New Yankee Workshop years ago.  I’m building a 2×4 framed work table that will feature a melamine top and a more professional Biesemeyer fence.  My Hitachi table saw will then sit inside this workstation and have access to a larger work surface.  I’m going to build this new table to the same height as my workbench, which will be able to act as either an outfeed or infeed table.

Here’s how it’s coming together so far.

Table Saw Upgrade #1

I started the build by measuring the dimensions of my Hitachi taking into account that the mobile base it’s attached to will be removed.  I then took those dimensions, drew some rough sketches on paper and added in some length and width for the fence system.  I start construction on the top frame, since that’s probably the most critical piece.

The sides are 2x4s and the front and back are 2x3s.  A lot of this wood I had left over from our coffered ceiling framing.  I joined the pieces together using pocket screws and liquid nail, but regular wood screws through the sides would work just fine too.

table saw workbench 1

I then flipped the frame over and started adding the internal frame boards.

table saw workbench 2

table saw workbench 3

The large open space is where the table saw will be located.  The rest of the table top will be melamine.  While I haven’t finished cutting out all of the melamine, you can get an idea of what it will look like with the last piece.  I want the melamine to be recessed into the framing, which will make more sense later.

table saw workbench 4

I’m hoping to finish the legs and sub framing later this week.  This quick project will hopefully make the cabinet project much easier.

So what’s your table saw situation?  Do have have a contractor’s saw?  Know anyone with a cabinet saw?  

 

Posted in Carpentry,DIY Projects,Garage and Tools. Tagged in ,, ,

Our New Tool Recommendations Page

Posted by on March 19th, 2014

One major addition to our blog that I’ve absolutely been itching to do is add a proper Tools page.  About a month or so ago, I added in our new menu bar with some new pages and I put in a placeholder page.  Well, this week I finally got an opportunity to publish the completed Tools page.   You can check out the new content my clicking on the “Tools” link in the menu bar or by clicking on this big link here:

tool-recommendations

CLICK HERE FOR MY TOOL RECOMMENDATIONS.

My goal is to keep adding to this list all of the tools I use for my various projects.  So far, I’ve gotten a good start on some basic recommendations for woodworking tools.  In the future, I’d like to add tools for Electrical, Plumbing and HVAC work as well.

So this is what I’d like you to do.  Take a look at my list and if you think I’m missing anything, leave me a comment in this post and tell me.  Tools can be very personal items, so I do expect some people to take exception to some of my choices.  No problem.  Would love to get some feedback or start a conversation about our favorite power tools, brands, etc.

Thanks!!

Posted in Tools. Tagged in ,,

How to Buy Power Tools on Craigslist or Ebay

Posted by on March 21st, 2013

Hey everybody!  Hope your week is going well.  We’re very close to wrapping up our built-in project.  Next week we should have some solid updates for you.  If you’re getting a little lost in the details, hang in there.  We have a LOT more furniture builds planned over the coming months and while I can’t go too much into detail yet, I can promise you that we’ll be sharing some detailed how-to’s for all of those projects.  You’ll have plenty of opportunity to add some carpentry skills to your DIY resume.

A couple of days ago, a blog-friend of ours, Whitney from Drab to Fab Design, posted about all the beautiful decor and furniture she picked up on Craigslist.  That got me thinking.  I should do a post on how to buy power tools on Craigslist and Ebay.  Lord knows I’ve bought my share of tools from random people.

Here are some pointers that I try to follow…

1.  Avoid buying tools that get heavily used by most people.  If you’re going to buy a cordless drill that you want to keep for a good number of years, buy a new one.  If you REALLY want to buy a used drill, then at least make sure it’s gently used and comes with multiple batteries and a charger.  A beat up drill can burn out pretty easy.  What other items are heavily used?  Depends who you’re buying from.  It would be helpful to ask how much action the tool has seen and you can generally get a sense of the material condition of a tool just by looking at it.

2.   Tools that people rarely use can be bought for big savings.  If you’re a DIYer you may be guilty of this yourself.  You have a project that uses a specific tool that after you’ve used it once, you may never use it again. I actually did a whole post on the tools I rarely use.  These are major “jackpot” items since the seller probably expects to take a hit on it compared to what was paid for it.  Buying a tool for a specific task even if used can be cheaper than renting it if you need it for a few days or weeks.  What kind of tools are these?  Floor nailers, framing and roofing nailers, cement mixers, tile saws, post diggers, welders, jointers, planers, scaffolding, etc.  The best part about buying single job tools is you can probably resell them again for at least what you paid for them or maybe more if you get a deal.

3.  Look for sales from people who are moving or retiring.  A few years ago I stopped by a sellers house to buy a jointer and ended up leaving with the jointer, a dust collection system and a spindle sander.  Did I need the extra tools? For the price he wanted to get rid of them, definitely.  Since he was moving, he didn’t want to hold out for extra cash from a buyer that may not happen.

4.  Look at the new version of the item first.  If you want to buy a used miter saw, for example, check out the latest model on the manufacturer’s website and try to get a used one that resembles it, especially if you don’t know how old the used item is.  As I’m sure you’re aware, some sellers will try to get rid of a table saw they bought in the 90s.  While it may be okay, it probably has way more use than you want.  Stick with the recent models.

5.  Make sure it works before you buy it.  If it has a cord, plug it in.  Seems like a no-brainer, but.. you know.  Check the power cord for electrical tape.  If it looks like the wiring has been repaired, you should probably skip it.

6.  Make sure you can carry it.  A lot of the larger power tools like table saws or band saws are deceptively heavy and oversized.  Before you roll up to a purchase in your sedan, make sure you can put it in your car.  You generally don’t want to goto a purchase alone anyway, so bring someone who can help you lift the parts.  You should be able to find the tool’s weight and dimensions somewhere online so you know what you’re in for.

Most importantly, be careful!  There are a ton of weirdos out there!!

 

 

Posted in Garage and Tools. Tagged in ,

Christmas Gifts for Guys

Posted by on November 19th, 2012

Can you believe Thanksgiving is this week already?  Ridiculous!  What’s even worse is we’ve already started decorating for Christmas.  Yikes.  It feels like it was Labor day just a couple of weeks ago!  We have a lot of fun Christmas activities planned per our usual holiday traditions.  There’s a ton to look forward to.  There is, however, one thing I dread every year and that is Christmas shopping.  I’m not a fan.  I never know what to buy Lisa.  It’s easier if she just tells me.  I can only imagine at least some of you suffer from the same ineptitude when it comes to buying gifts for your loved ones.  To help you out, Lisa and I are going to do back to back posts on what gifts we recommend this holiday season.  Yay!  I’ve written a post picking a bunch of gifts for the men in your life and Lisa will recommend gifts for the ladies.  We’re just trying to make life easier for everyone.  Plus, it’s fun to write lists.

Christmas Gifts for Guys 2012

1.  Black Ops 2.  Of course!  It’s the most exciting violent video game release since Modern Warfare 3 and Black Ops 1.  I’m all-in on this game.  This is literally at the top of my personal Christmas 2012 wish list.  Last year I made the switch from the COD franchise to Battlefield 3.  This year, I’m looking forward to getting back to Black Ops.  Is this an annoying gift to give your boyfriend or husband?  Maybe.  Does it beat watching golf and college football all day.  Yep.

2.  A Cordless Drill.

If he doesn’t already have one of these, get him one.  These drills are a thing of beauty.  I use one on nearly every DIY project I attempt.  Porter Cable also has a great 2 for 1 deal.  You can get a cordless impact driver and cordless drill for a pretty reasonable price.  Once my cordless DeWalt dies (if that ever happens in my lifetime), I’m going to grab a cordless impact driver.

3.  A Miter Saw.  These saws rule.  We have a sliding compound miter saw and I can’t live without it.  This Hitachi is a pretty basic unit, it’s just a compound miter, but it’s a great entry model.  If you’re up for something with a little more versatility, a sliding compound miter saw gets the job done.

4.  Beer of the Month Club.  This is a great gift.  If the beer is delivered right to your door, you don’t even have to stop playing Black Ops 2 to go out and buy some.  It’s a perfect.  Plus, guys are usually parched after using their cordless drill and miter saw all day.  For real though, a relative gave me a beer of the month club membership for Christmas a couple years ago and it was sweet.  There are 3 month, 6 month and 9 month options depending upon your budget.

5.  North Face Etip Gloves.    What a clever idea.  You don’t need to take your gloves off to use your touch screen smart phone or iPad.  Ingenious!  This is a great idea for regular skiers or anybody who spends a lot of time outdoors.

 

6.  A Kreg Pocket Hole Jig Kit.  This is a DIY blog.  We’re going to recommend a lot of home improvement products.  This may be my favorite.  We’ve built a ton of stuff using pocket holes… our first home’s kitchen cabinets, our garage shoe organizer, the dining room, on and on.  This is such a smart and easy to use system.  Great buy for any guy, but really anyone at all interested in DIYing.

Honorable Mention
Neck ties.  Lots of neck ties.

I’m pretty sure the guys on your shopping list won’t complain about any of the items above.  Unless they hate DIYing, video games, outdoors and have a gluten allergy.  Then it’s pretty much a bust.

***Full disclosure:  Lisa and I are members of Amazon.com associates.  If you purchase any of the items above, we get a small kickback.  If you’re interested in joining Amazon Associates, go to Affiliate-Program.Amazon.com ***

Posted in Blogging,Favorites,Holiday. Tagged in ,, , , , ,

What You Need to Know About Air Compressors

Posted by on September 28th, 2012

Hope everyone is having a good week.  With these days getting shorter, it’s becoming harder and harder to get work done outside.  It’s tough to stay motivated.  There are still a few outdoor tasks I’d like to take care of before it gets too cold.

One of the car related projects I’m going to try to knock out this weekend is restoring my headlights.  You can use a corded or cordless drill for the required sanding, but I’ll be using a 90 degree die grinder, which is a pneumatic or air powered tool.  This maybe the fifth or sixth different air powered tool I’ve used and talked about since I started blogging.  I think it’s about time I discussed air tools and compressors.  I’ll break this into two posts.

What You Need to Know About Air Compressors

If you’re planning on doing a good amount of home improvement and carpentry projects or you’re thinking about restoring a car or just doing some regular maintenance on your daily driver, you may want to purchase an air compressor.  Air powered tools range from nail guns to impact wrenches and paint sprayers and can make whatever job you’re working on much, much easier.  Nearly all air powered tools require a separate air source, which are generally air compressors.  Air compressors come in a variety of sizes, capacities, configurations and price and it’s important you select the proper one for your job.

The best way to select an air compressor is to figure out what air tools you’ll be using and then you can narrow down your options further.

(via Lowes.com)

1.  Pancake compressors.  These smaller units are perfect for nail guns that aren’t going to be used in constant repetition.  They’re lightweight and portable.  They’re ideal for smaller jobs like installing door and window trim or hardwood floors.  They’re also powerful enough for large framing nailers if you’re nailing 2x lumber.  I used a pancake compressor and a framing nailer to build the walls for my shed and I’ll use it again when I refinish our basement.  They cannot be used for spraying paint with an HVLP gun since these compressors are fine for small bursts of air, but not for prolonged uses.  The price is usually pretty reasonable, running around $100-$300, although you can definitely find them cheaper on craigslist.  Most often than not, if you buy them new, the air compressors come in kits with two or three nail guns.  Pancake compressors are usually maintenance free, but have a shorter lifespan than ones that actually require maintenance.

(via Lowes.com)

2.  Two tank compressors.  I don’t think they’re called two tank compressors, but that’s what I’m going to call them.  These are higher end versions of pancake compressors.  They’re a little more powerful, a little pricier and are commonly used by contractors.  They require regular maintenance, but can last longer than the pancake compressor.  Generally, they still have the same tool usage restrictions, i.e., you shouldn’t paint with it.  If you find a gently used model on ebay or craigslist, you may be in luck.

(via Lowes.com)

3.  Large air compressors.  These rock.  They’re large for a reason.  They can hold large amounts of air and are ideal for garage tools like impact wrenches for taking off lug nuts or painting cabinets or furniture with a paint gun.  They can take multiple air tool connections so you and your friends can frame that basement wall up with a couple guns at the same time.  The downside?  They’re heavier and pricier.  However, you can find new ones for roughly the same price as a new two tank model.

So that’s the basic variety of air compressors out there.  I’d recommend a pancake compressor for you typical home DIYer if you’re thinking about picking one up.

Do you own a compressor?  Are you thinking about getting one? 

Posted in Garage and Tools. Tagged in ,, , , , ,

Thinking About a Router Table

Posted by on June 12th, 2012

Another busy work week here! Thankfully, I’ve found some time to write a couple posts. I have not had a ton of time this week to read or comment on my normal reads. Hopefully I’ll get some more free time later this week. Sucks!

After we finish up the last wall in the dining room, it’ll be time to build a router table. I initially thought I’d be building one before I began the paneling. Figured I’d build it in February! Ha! That never happened. One of the biggest challenges to remodeling and DIY’ing, in my opinion, is making accurate guesstimates for finishing projects. It takes a lot of practice and experience to properly gauge how long it will take to complete a project. I’ve been wrong so many times with guessing project time that I’ve learned to be more realistic with planning. I’ll be optimistic in my thoughts, but what I commit to verbally is much different. Lisa has even learned to stop asking when I’ll finish something. I’ve learned to stop providing a time or date in the first place. We’ll finish a project when we finish it. This raised panel project is no different. The last time we committed to finishing a home project was during our flooring work in the family room. We wanted the floors installed in time for our daughter’s first birthday party. Even for that project, to make sure we didn’t run afoul of our schedule, we gave ourselves more than a month to add the flooring. So when it comes to schedules, I try to tread lightly.

So, where was I? Oh, right, a router table! While I haven’t finished nailing down the design yet, there are some basic elements that I want to incorporate.

Here’s my design requirement list. Hopefully, whatever I come up with will meet these goals.

1. Size and height. Much like the workbench project, I’d like a router table that is comfortable to work on. Ideally, the work surface will be large enough to accommodate whatever I throw on it. For this paneling project the pieces I’ll be milling are about 2′x2′ so the router table top should be able to hold these for machining with ease.

20120613-042527.jpg

20120613-042807.jpg

2. Simple Design. You can tell by the two photos above that there is a wide range of options when it comes to router table design. The first table is a more basic design that can be purchased online. The second is a home made version that offers an all wood construction an adds a ton of storage. I’m going to try to build mine from plywood, but stick to a more basic structure. I don’t want the router table to be a major project. It’s just a tool.

3. Cost. I’d love to use only the scrap wood I’ve got lying around. I don’t want to spend really much of anything on this project if I can avoid it. I think I have enough plywood and melamine left over from the workbench project that I can get by. We shall see.

4. Safety. One thing I may pony up for is a paddle switch like on the wooden router table shown above. I don’t want to have to reach up under the router table to turn it off… especially considering how fast these things turn!

5. Mobility. I’m probably going to add wheels so I can move it around the basement. I’ll try to either make it light or modular for easy disassembly. The MDF panels are likely to be milled outside considering how many I have to machine. That will prevent the basement from filling up with dust! Keeping the table’s weight low will help with bringing it up and down the steps.

So that’s what I’m thinking. And I promise to have it all finished by tomorrow night. Completely. Done. No doubt about it. I promise. ;)

Hope your week is going well. Do you have issues with estimating projects?

Posted in Carpentry,Garage and Tools,Tools. Tagged in ,, , , ,

Essential Woodworking Tools

Posted by on May 30th, 2012

Last month, I wrote a post about woodworking tools that I feel are essential for every basement or garage workshop.  The items I listed are commonly found items and they can be picked up at any home improvement store.  If you’re adventurous, you can also buy a lot of quality used tools from Craigslist.  MOST of the larger workshop tools I own were bought on Craigslist.  A lot of these items are like cars, the minute someone drives home with them new, the value drops quite a bit.  Consequently, I do have a good amount of tools, but in reality, they probably aren’t worth much at all since they are heavily used.

Since I wrote that post, I have been thinking of items that I forgot to add and I realized that you could probably get away with professional results for very low money.  For a couple hundred dollars, you could get a bunch of smaller, new tools that will get the job done.  Interested in building your own cabinets?  You don’t actually need a table saw.  Does it help?  You bet.  But, you could certainly do it without it.

Here’s my list of essential woodworking tools:

1. A Circular Saw:  With a sharp blade, a circular saw can get you major results.  I use one all. the. time.  When I was building my workbench, I used it to cut sections off my long sheet goods.  Even with a table saw, there are a lot of cuts that you can’t make without using special jigs.  The circular saw can usually handle those cuts without much fuss.  It’s not ideal for cutting very thick pieces of hardwood or building fine furniture, but for cabinets, shelves or built-ins, it’s the best.

2.  A Straight Edge and some C-Clamps or an All in One Clamp:  Have you ever tried to make a straight cut with a circular saw??  It’s not easy to do it free hand.  Here’s a tip though, if you clamp a long straight edge along the piece you’re cutting and butt the circular saw up against the straight edge, you can get a cut as straight and perfect as a table saw.  This is the very method I used on my workbench.  You can’t go wrong with this approach.

3.  A Jigsaw:  For making curved cuts, or even small straight cuts, a jigsaw is perfect.  Plus, you can usually get one for under $60.  If you’re interested in making perfectly straight cuts, you can also butt it up against a straight edge.  I don’t use one often, but when I do, they are indispensable…  pretty much the Dos Equis of power tools.

4.  A Hand Saw:  Am I starting to sound like your grandfather?  Everyone should own a basic handsaw.  Why use a handsaw when you can use a circular saw?  Because a handsaw can be used up on ladders and with your arms extended out from you.  Circular saws can get heavy and are obviously incredibly dangerous if used improperly.  Hand saws are a great backup and majorly cheap.

5.  A Router:  Admittedly, the most expensive item on my list.  You can get a great router for $100 new and well under $50 for a used one.  I prefer Porter Cable or DeWalt.  If you get a Craftsman, make sure it’s a more recent model.  The less plastic on the housing, the better, in my opinion.  Remember that jointer that I recommended in my last tools post?  A router can do the same job a jointer can do for 1/3 or less of the cost (with the right bit and a straight edge, of course.  Should’ve called this post “Uses for Straight Edges”).  Plus, routers can be used for what they’re intended for… putting profiles on hardwood.  I don’t use a router very often either, but they are nice to have just in case.  On a side note, I will be building a router table soon for our raised panel project, so you’ll soon get to see their usefulness.

I can’t believe it’s Wednesday already!!  Still feel like my week is just starting.  Not sure if that’s a good thing or a bad thing.  Do you own a hand saw?  How about a circular saw?  Do you ever use them?

***Full disclosure:  Lisa and I are members of Amazon.com associates.  If you purchase any of the items above, we get a small kickback.  If you’re interested in joining Amazon Associates, go to Affiliate-Program.Amazon.com ***

Posted in Garage and Tools. Tagged in ,,

A List of Woodworking Tools

Posted by on April 27th, 2012

My reading interest tends to vary with my energy level.  Some days I want to dive into a deep, multi-page scientific journal entry about the quest to find the Higgs Boson or read the entire Wikipedia page on early church history.  Finishing large articles can be rewarding.  Leaves you feeling like you read a novel.  Other days, I don’t have the time or the energy for that type of reading commitment   On those days, I like reading lists.  Today is one of those days.

I always enjoy listmania on Amazon.com.  I enjoy seeing what other people would buy if they had the time or the money.  I think you can tell a lot about someone by what they want to own as opposed to what they do own.  I should probably start one myself, but I may be tempted to add those items to my shopping cart prematurely.

Since I started renovating, I’ve had a running list of woodworking tools that I believe are necessary to complete most projects the average DIYer/renovator/woodworker would attempt.  This is the bulk of that list.

1.  A Cordless Drill.  You don’t need a cordless lithium ion impact driver like this Makita, but a regular old cordless drill is really a shop necessity.  Corded is OK too, but the cordless is where it’s at.

2.  A Table Saw.  Absolutely necessary.  You can make nearly every cut you’ll need with a table saw.  Doesn’t have to be a Cadillac, but it has to at least run.

jet jointer

3.  A Jointer.  What’s a jointer?  Well, after you’ve cut a board on the table saw and let’s say you bought it at Lowes, you have a clean factory edge that hasn’t been cut and you have the edge that went through the blade.  The cut edge almost always will be wavy and won’t be finish quality until it’s been cleaned up.  The jointer is a machine that has a rotating set of knives that will clean that nasty edge up.  You can run boards on edge through it or face down.  It’s generally not for plywood, mainly for hardwood.

4.  A Miter Saw.  You need one.  Big time.  It’s really the only way to cut boards to length (as opposed to the table saw, which cuts boards to width).

5.  A Kreg Jig.  Perfect for assembling cabinets, built-ins, workbenches (wink wink), pretty much anything with a straight edge.  There are a number of different sized kits.  The one pictured is only about $20.  Make sure you get a clamp.  The Kreg system relies on clamps.

6.  A Thickness Planer.  It’s loud and it will save you money.  Most project wood you’re going to use is 1x, which means it’s actually 3/4″ thick.  It’s not cheap.  But if you’re buying it then you’re building something.  Building it yourself is certainly cheaper than buying it already made and it’s absolutely cheaper than having a contractor build it for you.  A thickness planer is the next step in DIYing.  Home improvement stores mark up the wood because it’s ready to go.  You can take it home and cut it, glue it, and paint it.  The type of hardwood (oak, poplar, pine, aspen) that these stores sell is called S4S or Sanded Four Sides.  If you skip the big home improvement warehouses and buy the wood directly from a lumber yard you can save a lot of money… especially on big projects.  Here’s the catch:  the wood from lumber yards isn’t 3/4″ thick (it’s thicker) and it isn’t ready for much of anything.  That’s where the thickness planer comes in.  You can take that rough cut lumber and plane it down to 3/4″ thick.  It’s more work on your end, but it’s worth it.

Here’s a quick video that shows how the jointer and the thickness planer work.

7.  A Shop Vac.  Every item above will create an unbelievable amount of saw dust, especially the table saw and the thickness planer.

8.  A Random Orbital Sander.  Extremely useful.  Can’t finish a woodworking project without it!

Did I miss anything?  If you don’t own any of these items yet, but you still want to eventually tackle some woodworking projects, don’t fret.  There are plenty of quality used equipment on Craigslist and Ebay that have very little use that can be bought for a great price. 

***Full disclosure:  Lisa and I are members of Amazon.com associates.  If you purchase any of the items above, we get a small kickback.  If you’re interested in joining Amazon Associates, go to Affiliate-Program.Amazon.com ***

Posted in Carpentry,Garage and Tools. Tagged in ,,

How to Build a Workbench

Posted by on April 16th, 2012

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Happy Monday!  Finally some meat instead of potatoes.  This weekend I started and finished a work bench I had planned earlier.  This table will be the perfect work center for other upcoming projects like our dining room wainscoting and will be a good start to getting our basement organized.  I incorporated a Kreg Klamp Trak for easier pocket holes as well.  Makes joinery much more convenient.  I’m going to try to learn Google SketchUp so I can start posting plans for some project, this work bench being one of them.  I also tried to incorporate some of Ethan’s suggestions from his earlier workbench post.

build-a-workbench

Here’s how to build a workbench.

1.  I planned to make the overall width 36″ and the height 33.”  I chose a 3″ caster wheel (4″ overall), a 3/4″ melamine top and a 1/2″ plywood sub-top.  That leaves 27 3/4″ for the legs.  I made my legs out of 2x4s and cut all four to length.  To each leg, I added a 12″ long smaller piece of 2×4.  I glued and nailed them together.

2.  The legs were braced together with 2x4s that were glued and joined with pocket screws.  The width of the pieces were determined by subtracting the width of the legs from the overall width of the table and the top overhang (the top melamine piece will overhang the table by 1″ on each side.

3.  The longer side pieces were done the same way.  The overall length of the table is 60″ with the framing length of 58″ (subtract 2″ from 60).  Once the 2×4 legs are subtracted, that leaves 51″ for the side piece lengths.  The bottom shelf length is recessed in by 1 2×4 and I used a 2×4 beneath it to support it while I screwed it in.

4.  The dimensions for ribs for the top and the bottom shelf were measured right off of the frame.  I nailed them into place with a dab of glue for good measure.

5.  With the framing completed, it’s time for the plywood.  The top will get covered with a melamine, but under that I added a 1/2″ thick sheet of plywood.  Since it’s going to be almost completely hidden once the final top is on, I used a lower grade BC plywood, which is cheaper.  Since the bottom shelf is going to be seen, I added AC plywood there.  Both pieces were glued and screwed into place.

6.  Screwed on some caster wheels!!

7.  Time for the top.  The Kreg Klamp is around 34″ long which fits perfectly in on my 36″ wide table top.  Funny thing about this Klamp… I needed special T type bolts to hold it down and I couldn’t find anything that would work.  I ended up using toilet bolts!! They were in a pack I never used and they fit perfectly!!  To attach the melamine top, I just put down a lot of Liquid Nail (which is the only glue I used on this entire project, btw) and then added screws in from below.

8.  Add some corner brackets.  These brackets were fairly inexpensive and will hopefully add some durability.  That’s about it.  Not too hard.

Just to be on the safe side, I’ve added some clamps to really keep the melamine top squeezed down until the glue cures.  I’ll pop those off after 24 hours.

Can’t wait to start piling crap onto that bottom shelf and using this table for some projects!  How was your weekend?  Get anything done?

Posted in Carpentry,DIY Projects,Garage and Tools. Tagged in ,, ,