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How to Install Cabinet Hardware Without a Jig

Posted by on October 27th, 2014

In this post, you’ll learn:

- a simple method for installing cabinet hardware

It seems that the closer I get to finishing this home office project, more small tasks keep popping up and they’re taking much longer than I anticipated.  Case in point: the cabinet hardware.  It took me a good two and a half hours to get two cabinets done.  Killer.  Still have to add the hardware to the filing cabinet.  At this rate, our office should be completely done by the time our 3 year old heads to college.

Let’s talk cabinet hardware for a second.  Lisa picked our gear out.  I was completely hands off on this one, although I let her know which ones I definitely didn’t like.  It’s pretty much the exact same conversation we have when we’re trying to pick a restaurant for dinner, except slightly more expensive.  Although.. you can return hardware if you don’t like it even after you’ve taken it home.  Can’t do that at a restaurant.

We were originally thinking some shell pulls, but we didn’t see any we liked.  We ended up with a basic 3.5″ nickel pull from Lowes.  Instead of using a jig for this job, like the one I made for our Large Built-in cabinet, I went old-school and just drew some lines and drilled some holes.  Not quite as fast, but just as effective.  Here’s how it went.

How to Install Cabinet Hardware without a Jig

Here’s the cabinet before we got started.

built in cabinet

I started by applying some blue painters tape across the drawer front.  I roughly aimed for the middle, but it wasn’t terribly important at this point.  Once the tape was on, I measured down from the top of the drawer edge to the middle of the drawer front.  I did that on both sides of the drawer front and used a straight edge to connect the dots.  I now had a straight line across the drawer front that marked the center line.

I also applied some painters tape vertically to coincide with the center of the doors below.  I marked those vertical tape pieces at the same dimension as half the width of the door.

painters tape on cabinet

Now I was ready to use my hardware for the next step.

I lined up the hardware on the center line of the drawer front and positioned it over the mark for the door centers.  That way the screw holes will both be in the same line and the middle of the piece will be directly over the middle of the door.  If this sounds confusing, just take a look at the pictures, it’s a bit cumbersome to describe.

cabinet hardware install

While I was holding the hardware in place, I traced around the hardware where it sat against the drawer front.

Now I had my drill marks.

tape cabinet

The first hole I drilled was a small pilot hole just to get through the drawer.  I then went up to a drill bit diameter that was slightly larger than the screw for the drawer pull.  I repeated this same basic process for the door pulls.  Just tape it, draw a center line and then position it where you want it.  Drill twice and you’re done.  The painters tape helps keep the wood from tearing and you can draw right on it without having to worry about touching up your cabinet’s paint job.

cabinet hardware installed

We were originally going to go with just one pull on the drawer fronts, but I think it looks more substantial with the two.

Here’s what’s left for this room:

1.  Paint the new baseboards, window sills and inside of the door.

2.  Install quarter round trim

3.  Clean up and touch up

4.  New window shades

5.  Drill some access holes for computer power cord, printer cable, etc.

6.   Finish decor and wall hangings
Oh and I’m also repairing a few nail pops, because you know… I didn’t have enough to do in here already.

 

Later this week I’m going to be starting to configure our new forum section.  Keep your fingers crossed!  Hoping to setup an area on our site where everyone can share their own projects, show off their results and ask for help with home projects!  I’ve also commissioned a new blog theme, so our look is going to dramatically change.  Hoping to get that in place before the holidays.  I won’t be coding it myself this time, so it should go fairly quick.  We have some big, big changes headed your way over the next few months… if this office doesn’t kill me first.

Posted in DIY Projects,Kitchen. Tagged in ,, , ,

Garage Shoe Organizer Finished

Posted by on November 12th, 2012

***UPDATE:  The woodworking plans for this Shoe Organizer have just been uploaded to our Plans page.  To get access, just subscribe to our free newsletter using the sign-up form in the sidebar or following this post.  Immediately after you subscribe, you’ll get an email with a link to the Plans page.***

Hope you all enjoyed your Veteran’s Day, especially if you were home from work like I was!  Big thanks to all those who served and those that continue to serve today.  With the extra free time this weekend, I was finally able to get the garage shoe organizer finished!  Jackpot.

After finishing up the build portion of the project, I brought the piece up to the garage for painting.  The plan was to spray on a couple coats of white primer and then follow that up with a couple coats of black gloss.  Those plans changed once I started spraying the primer.

garage shoe organizer

shoe organizer primed

I had a hard time getting good coverage in between those shelf areas.  It took some contorting.  It also took a lot of primer.  I went through 3 cans!  I couldn’t believe it needed that much.  So instead of repeating this process with the black gloss, I just opted for a small roller and a brush.  I’m kinda picky when it comes to painting.  Spray paint is almost always my first choice.  You get a nice even coat that looks professional.  Using a roller and a brush is nice, but it can leave brush marks and it never goes on as smooth.

But, you know what?  This piece is plywood and it’s going to be holding our shoes in the garage.  It’s not going to be in the Guggenheim.  I can roll the darn thing.

DIY shoe rack

You know what?  It didn’t come out too bad.  The roller and brush method worked just fine.  To install the shelves to the wall, I used toggle bolts for the top two holes and regular screws for the bottom set.  The bottom brace on the shelf coincided with some lumber in the wall.

The toggle bolts are great for holding heavier objects to drywall.  I trust them over molly bolts any day.  To use them, I just drilled two holes in the top plate with a drill bit just a touch bigger than the diameter of the bolts.

To recess the bolt a touch, I then used a bigger drill bit and only drilled the hole halfway through the wood.  Unfortunately, the plywood tore out some.  You can eliminate this tear out by either using tape over the hole or starting the drill before you engage the bit with the wood.  No big deal though.  I can touch up the paint or just cover the holes.  If I were using regular hardwood and not plywood, I wouldn’t expect this type of damage from drilling.  But, with plywood, those laminate layers can tear occasionally.  Oh well.  Lesson learned.

The toggle bolts are a two piece system.  You actually need to setup the bolt onto the piece you’re fastening before you insert anything into the wall.

The other catch with toggle bolts is they need a large hole drilled into the drywall.  These required a 5/8″ size hole.  That’s pretty sizable.  The biggest bit I have in that range is 1/2″.  To get to 5/8″, I just worked the hole a bit.  It’s easy to expand drywall.

Once the bolts are inserted into the wall though, they grab pretty good.  As long as no one really puts any major weight on this shelf, they should hold nicely.

close up of shoe rack

I like it.  More importantly, Lisa likes it.  It works pretty well too.  We put enough shelves in there just in case they start piling up out there.

shoe organizer done

So now more piles of shoes all over these steps.  Makes going in and out a little less of a hassle.

If you can’t tell from some of those photos, the garage overall still needs a good amount of cleaning up.  Trying to make some time to get to that, but it’s not easy.  It tends to be somewhat weather dependent too.

shoe-rack

Planning on any projects in your garage?  How do you keep your shoes organized?

Posted in Carpentry,Garage and Tools,Staining and Painting. Tagged in ,, , , , ,