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Setting Up Shop: Table Saw Upgrade Part 3

Posted by on July 28th, 2014

This past week the family and I spent a few days vacation in Cape May, NJ.  Been going there since I was a kid.  Great family town.  Lots of beautiful Victorian style homes.  Made a visit to the Cape May Brewing Company while we were down there and tried some of their delicious beer.  Got me thinking about trying to brew my own beer someday soon.  I think I may need a whole other blog for that though!  Anyway, didn’t get too sunburned so that’s a relief.  I just turned 35 a few weeks ago and I’m at the age (and hair density) where I apparently need to apply a generous amount of sunscreen to the top of my head.  Womp womp.

Anyway, was able to get back into the workshop and finish up my table saw upgrade.  Let’s pickup where we left off after our first and second posts.

The frame was all built using some scrap plywood ripped down to 3.5″ in width.  Once I was out of plywood, I finished the rest of the minor framing using 2x4s.  They were in non-critical areas so I’m not too concerned about their imperfections causing and issues with the saw.

table saw work station 1

I then screwed down a piece of 1/2″ thick plywood right where the saw will be located.  Turns out I probably could have used a 3/4″ thick board because I needed to shim the saw up some to get it flush with the table top.

table saw bench 1

The saw has to be secured in place so it doesn’t move relative to the table or fence so I just went out and bought some longer hex bolts to keep the saw where it’s supposed to be.  I also cut out a hole for the dust to be removed.  At some point I’ll hook up a dust collection system and this hole will come in handy.

table saw work station 2

table saw saw installed

The tricky part was installing the Biesemeyer fence system.  This fence was a leftover from my previous table saw and has been collecting dust in my basement for several years now.  It simply bolts onto the front frame of the table.

completed table saw table

The fence system has a built-in tape measure that I calibrate by squeezing a 3/4″ thick board between the fence and the blade and then setting the indicator to 3/4″.  Later on I’ll adjust the fence to ensure it is square to the blade.  I’ll also show this table saw station in more detail in an upcoming video.

table saw fence

table saw workstation fence

The best part of this table saw setup is it’s the same exact height as my other work table and the router table.  That means they can all be in-feed or out-feed tables for each other.  That alone is going to make cutting large sheets of plywood MUCH MUCH easier.

outfeed table

So in a few hours worth of work I’ve managed to build myself a simple work bench that compliments the other tables in the shop, adds over seven inches of width to the amount I can cut and cost me around $50 worth of fasteners, wheels and wood.  Not too bad.  This project is perfect if you’re looking to improve your table saw situation.

If you don’t have a Biesemeyer fence, which I wouldn’t expect you to, you can check out these picks from Amazon (affiliates): the Vega PRO, the Delta 36-T30 and the Shop Fox.

In our next post, I’ll be featuring a video on the basics of routers and router tables.

Posted in Carpentry,DIY Projects,Garage and Tools. Tagged in ,, ,

Setting Up Shop: Table Saw Upgrade Part 2

Posted by on July 21st, 2014

“Let’s start over.”

That’s what I said to myself a couple of days ago.  In case you missed it, I built the top to my table saw work station out of 2x4s.  I was planning on building the rest of it out of 2x4s too and while I was reasonably satisfied with the results so far, I DID run into some warped and twisted boards.  That’s going to happen when you work with framing lumber.  It’s just the way it is.  It’s not intended for tight tolerances or fine furniture.  It’s for framing houses, which is why it’s called framing lumber.

The same day I published last week’s post I got an email from one of our awesome subscribers, Rick.  I could tell right away Rick knows his stuff.  Rick was honest, experienced and suggested I not use 2x4s for this project since my intention is to make a fairly accurate table saw station.  Accurate cuts are obviously important and having a table top made from 2x4s doesn’t help.  Rick suggested I use planed and cut hardwood boards instead.  Planed hardwood boards, like maple or oak, will be much more stable and less prone to warping or twisting and will therefore provide a much higher quality product.

As soon as I read Rick’s email, I knew he was right, but I dithered.  I was telling myself that I already spent around $20 on 2x4s and I’m sure it would turn out okay.  I was lying to myself.  I kindly replied to Rick that he was right, but I had already purchased a whopping $20 worth of wood and I didn’t want to invest in the hardwood upgrade.

I’m also stubborn.

After thinking about it for a few days, I realized that I MIGHT actually have enough leftover plywood from some previous projects that I could build the entire table over again.  After all, I had only built the top and it probably only took me an hour.  I checked my inventory (my giant pile of scraps on the basement floor) and sure enough, I had enough for maybe 80% of the table.  Okay.  I could do this.

Let’s start over.

If you’re not a regular woodworker or are just getting into this sort of  thing, plywood is actually more dimensionally stable then hardwood and MUCH more stable than 2x4s or framing lumber.  The reason is it’s a board made from thinner laminations of hardwood where the grain alternates directions from one layer to the next.  Consequently, it’s much less likely to suffer from twists, cups or any of those annoying features that is common in framing lumber.  Plywood is perfect for shelves, cabinets and all sorts of carpentry projects where stability is important (like my garage shoe organizer).   It’s also cheaper than hardwood.  Not quite as pretty, but cheaper.

So big thank you to Rick for reminding me that it was worth taking the time to do this project correctly.  I owe you a beer.

Anyway, I re-built the top out of plywood.  You probably can’t tell from the photo, but it’s a much better product.

table saw workbench 2

This is pretty much where we left off last time.  I then cut out the melamine for the work surface.  The open area is where the table saw will be located.  I didn’t permanently install the melamine yet since it would just get in the way during the rest of the build.

table saw workbench 1

Now for the legs.  Just a couple of plywood boards with pocket screws.

table saw work bench legs

I topped them off with a couple of small plywood pieces for the wheels.

table saw work table legs wheels

Flipping it back over, I threw on some cross braces, which is where the table saw will ultimately be located.

table saw workbench 3

That’s it for this post.  In our next post I’ll finish the build and setup the fence.

Ever start a project over after realizing you could’ve done better?  Leave a comment below and explain yourself.  

 

Posted in Carpentry,DIY Projects. Tagged in ,, , ,

Setting Up Shop: Table Saw Upgrade #1

Posted by on July 13th, 2014

If you’ve been following along lately, you know that we’re knee deep in our home office renovation.  In our last post, we discussed the work we’ve done to date and what work was coming soon.  We’re starting the second half our office project today by upgrading my main workshop power tool, the table saw.  For what it’s worth, you can expect a lot of workshop posts and videos in the coming weeks.

Here’s my current table saw, a Hitachi.

hitachi table saw

What I like about it… It’s a great table saw.  It’s powerful, it’s lightweight, portable and it’s perfect for most DIY projects.  (By the way, on our Tool Recommendations Page, I recommend the Bosch model instead since it permits dado blades, whereas the Hitachi does not.  So, if you are in the market for your first table saw, consider the Bosch over the Hitachi.)

Now for what I don’t like about this saw and frankly, contractor saws in general.  It’s not such a great cabinet saw, which means it’s not ideal for cutting big plywood sheets.  It’s a bit undersized, so larger pieces of plywood tend to be more of a challenge than I’d like.  The table will move or wobble slightly when I place a larger sheet of wood down on it and it doesn’t have much of an outfeed setup.  For long pieces of wood I have to walk around the back of the saw and pull the piece through once it starts hanging off the back.  I’m sure that’s pretty common for people who use these types of saws, but it’s not ideal nor is it very safe, folks.  It also only allows cuts up to around 24″ or so, which also isn’t great for wide cabinet parts.

While I’d love to buy a full blown cabinet saw, those are pretty pricey and would really only be worth my investment if I opened up a cabinet shop (not interested).  Here’s an example of what a cabinet saw looks like:

grizzly table saw

This is a Grizzly brand table saw (affiliate link).  Now THIS is a cabinet saw.  You can click the link to see how much it costs, but it’s close to $2k.  My hitachi was around $300.  Yeah.  Not interest in spending that sorta dough.  Eventually, I plan on buying one way down the road, but I’m not in any hurry.  These saws have powerful motors and huge table tops.  They are VERY heavy and don’t move a lick when you slap a board down on them.

So what to do?  Well, I’ve decided to make a sort of hybrid table saw station similar to something I saw on New Yankee Workshop years ago.  I’m building a 2×4 framed work table that will feature a melamine top and a more professional Biesemeyer fence.  My Hitachi table saw will then sit inside this workstation and have access to a larger work surface.  I’m going to build this new table to the same height as my workbench, which will be able to act as either an outfeed or infeed table.

Here’s how it’s coming together so far.

Table Saw Upgrade #1

I started the build by measuring the dimensions of my Hitachi taking into account that the mobile base it’s attached to will be removed.  I then took those dimensions, drew some rough sketches on paper and added in some length and width for the fence system.  I start construction on the top frame, since that’s probably the most critical piece.

The sides are 2x4s and the front and back are 2x3s.  A lot of this wood I had left over from our coffered ceiling framing.  I joined the pieces together using pocket screws and liquid nail, but regular wood screws through the sides would work just fine too.

table saw workbench 1

I then flipped the frame over and started adding the internal frame boards.

table saw workbench 2

table saw workbench 3

The large open space is where the table saw will be located.  The rest of the table top will be melamine.  While I haven’t finished cutting out all of the melamine, you can get an idea of what it will look like with the last piece.  I want the melamine to be recessed into the framing, which will make more sense later.

table saw workbench 4

I’m hoping to finish the legs and sub framing later this week.  This quick project will hopefully make the cabinet project much easier.

So what’s your table saw situation?  Do have have a contractor’s saw?  Know anyone with a cabinet saw?  

 

Posted in Carpentry,DIY Projects,Garage and Tools. Tagged in ,, ,

Get on Board with Our Cabinet Build

Posted by on July 7th, 2014

Happy Monday, folks.  We hope all of our American readers enjoyed their 4th of July weekend!  Lisa and I took the kids over to the USS New Jersey on Saturday afternoon.  It’s the closest Battleship to our home in South Jersey.  I’m a HUGE fan of the Iowa Class Battleships.

Gotta tell you… I was not disappointed.  Tremendous history there.  If you ever get the chance to go on one of the Iowa’s, I suggest you take it.  The USS Iowa is in LA, the USS New Jersey is in Camden,  the USS Missouri is in Pearl Harbor and the USS Wisconsin is in Norfolk.  I’ve been on the Wisconsin before, but if I recall correctly, the tour was limited.  The New Jersey tour is impressive, although the teak deck is in rough shape in some areas.

uss-new-jersey-guns

I’m leading today off with this Navy reference for a good reason.  If you haven’t yet subscribed to our free newsletter, now it the perfect time to GET ON BOARD!  See what I did there?

So we’ve finished most of the work on our coffered ceiling and later this week I’ll be prepping to build the built-in cabinets for our big home office remodel.  Part of the prep work will include setting up my basement workshop and I’m planning on filming a 30-40 minute long episode after it’s all done.  I will also be filming some quick five minute long videos going over each of the power tools I’ll be using for the cabinet build.  If you’ve never used a table saw or a router, this is right up your alley.  I’m also in need of a larger table saw station and a more permanent miter saw stand before I get started.

That’s why this is the PERFECT time to get on board with our free newsletter and follow along with the project as it unfolds.  Building cabinets is our bread and butter and if you’re interested in learning how to make your own, you’re going to enjoy this series.

Subscribe to our newsletter

What I’m going to cover:

1. The Table Saw
2. The Miter Saw
3. The Router
4. The Cordless Drill
5. The Kreg Jig
6. Cabinet Building Jigs
7. Design and Dimensioning
8. Face Frame
9. Cabinet Boxes
10. Assembly
11. Finishing
12. Installation

Sounds good?  Have any questions on the cabinet build process that you’d like answered?  Leave me a comment below and I’ll try to answer it.  Big fan of big ships?  Would love to hear what ships you’ve been on!

Posted in Carpentry,DIY Projects. Tagged in ,, ,

5 Tips for Better Crown Molding Results

Posted by on June 26th, 2014

I’m relieved to finally tell you that all of the crown molding has been installed in our home office.  It was a bear.  Granted, I still have to putty all the nail holes, caulk the joints and paint them.  I’ll save that work for the weekend.  That’s not the end of the molding in the office either.  Once the built-ins are completed and installed, I still have to install a final piece of wall trim and all the baseboard molding.  However, that type of trim work should be considerably easier to handle.

In today’s post, I’m sharing a video tutorial I made (with Lisa as camera lady) as well as some additional info below where I discuss some of the techniques I used to get better crown molding results.

coffered ceiling

Tips for Better Crown Molding Results

1.  Pre-paint your Molding.  While not hugely important, getting at least one good coat of paint on the molding BEFORE you install it will allow you to only have to paint it one more time after it’s installed.  That’s less time on the ladder.

2.  Use Backer Blocks.  In the video, I use some simple plywood backer blocks.  These little blocks can be cut from scrap wood and provide the crown molding a solid surface to lay against.  It makes installation SO MUCH EASIER.  After this list, I’ve shared a quick tutorial on making your own backer blocks.

3.  Make a Cut Guide.  Before measuring and cutting any intersecting crown molding pieces, make a cut guide with a piece of scrap crown molding.  The guide can have a 45 degree cut on both ends and can be used to determine if any adjustments need to be made before the actual piece is cut.  You’d rather find out that your molding needs a slight adjustment before you cut through it.

4.  Use a Crown Molding Jig.  While I do recommend using the Bench Dog Crown Molding Jig (affiliate link), you can just as easily make your own using some scrap lumber and a couple of clamps.

5.  Be Strategic with your Boards.  When you walk by the office or look inside, all of the crown molding pieces that face you don’t have any miter cuts.  They all are straight pieces.  That’s intentional.  All of the cut boards are on the sides of the boxes.  That way, even if the joints aren’t perfect, almost no one will notice if they stick their head in the room.  Getting the joints done right is important, but any minor mistakes will be less visible this way.

 

How to Make Backer Blocks for Crown Molding

1.  You’ll need a carpenter’s square, a small piece of the crown molding, a paper, and a pen.

crown molding tips

2.  Arrange the crown molding inside the carpenter’s square so that both the top and bottom flats of the molding are flat against the square.  This is how the crown molding will look when installed.

crown molding tips 2

3.  Using a pen or a pencil, trace the inside triangle made by the molding and the square.

crown molding tips 3

4.  You can remove the square and the molding.

crown molding help

5.  Measure the length of the top and the length of the side, marked here as “A” and “B,” respectively.

crown molding help 2

6.  Now for some math.  Using a scientific calculator or an online calculator take the inverse tangent (tan raised to the -1) of A over B (A/B).  If you do that math, you get 38.7 degrees or roughly 39 degrees.  Now you can set your table saw angle to that value.  All you need to do now is make sure you cut the board to the length of “A,” which in this case is 1″.

crown molding backer block

crown molding cheater block

To make things easier on you, you can also lay that drawing on your miter saw and use the miter saw’s gauge to determine the angle of the molding.  OR you can just use a protractor.

For our home office, the larger molding had a block with an angle of 36 degrees and as mentioned above, the smaller molding was 39 degrees.

I hope you found this post helpful.  Even if you’re not planning any crown molding work, keep this project in mind for when you do.

Now I’d like to hear from you.  Do you have any crown molding installation tips or tricks?

Posted in Carpentry,DIY Projects,Videos. Tagged in ,, , ,

Sliding Kitchen Cabinet Drawer Plans

Posted by on June 16th, 2014

Happy Monday folks.

sliding-drawer-plans

Today I have just uploaded our latest set of free woodworking plans.  The plans are for the sliding kitchen cabinet drawers.

The plans are free to our newsletter subscribers.

Get the FREE plans for this project
Join our newsletter and be part of a community of DIYers and Home Improvement enthusiasts.

The plans feature a calculator that lets you enter two simple measurements to generate custom dimensions for each cabinet in your kitchen.

Enjoy!

Posted in Carpentry,DIY Projects. Tagged in ,, , , ,

Your Home from Scratch #4: Andrea’s Custom Vanity

Posted by on May 27th, 2014

If you ask me what I enjoy the ABSOLUTE MOST about blogging, my answer is always helping others with their home projects.   Hands down the best part of this gig.  I love getting comments or emails from readers expressing their gratitude for something they found on our site.  Really makes my day.  Just last week, one of our newsletter subscribers emailed me some pictures of her custom bathroom vanities she built from scratch.  She told me that she was able to complete the task after reading our TV stand series.  I was so impressed with her work that we’re featuring her vanities as our 4th installment of Your Home from Scratch.

You guys.  Wait to you see these cabinets.

Andrea’s Custom Vanity

white vanity

1.  Your vanities are beautiful.  Why did you decide to build them instead of buying them?

Thanks for inviting me to share in your blog!  I decided to try to build these vanities after pricing ones that I really loved and found them over-the-top expensive for the value and quality of construction.  For the double sink vanity prices were $1000 +, the single vanity $700+ – add on tax and shipping and that was the deal breaker.  Also, I wanted my mirrors and vanities to match.

vanity mirror

2.  How much money do you think you saved by building them yourself?
Assuming I bought the two vanities mentioned above at $1800, minus my supplies $300 (?), I guess I saved about $1500.  

custom vanity
3.  How long did it take you to build and did you have much carpentry experience before you started?

It took me 1 month of on-and-off work while carpenters did complicated bath renovation including moving walls, plumbing and electric.  My only other carpentry experience comes from building a step back cupboard a few years ago.  I had a picture from an antique catalog, so I started by drawing a picture on the wall where I wanted it to be to get the starting dimensions and then drew up plans on graph paper.  Oh, I am also building my 2nd canoe.

canoe

4.  Give us a quick overview of how you built them.  Did you use roughly the same build method as our TV stand?  What material?
I built the first single vanity using your plans for the entertainment cabinet.  I figured out the width dimensions first and built the face frame.  I did want the cabinet to sit on Shaker legs to appear as a piece of furniture, so I extended the right and left vertical face frame pieces to extend about 3″ below the lower horizontal piece. I used poplar wood as you suggested, along with cabinet grade birch veneer plywood for sides, base and shelves.  For the second, larger double sink vanity, I again determined the width first.  I knew I wanted 3 doors so I evenly spaced them and repeated the same steps as the first vanity.

vanity legs

5.  What sort of finish product did you use (Latex paint, acrylic, lacquer)?

As far as the finish,  I again used your advice of applying 2 coats of latex primer and 2 coats of latex paint.  I got the most perfect finish using a velour covered, small roller from Sherwin Williams.  The finish is so perfect that it looks factory applied.  I was very pleased with this roller finish.  I did lightly sand between coats.  Beautiful.

6.  What was the hardest part of the project?

The hardest part of the project was becoming familiar and comfortable with using the radial arm saw, skill saw, table saw and biscuit jointer  (affiliate) ( I don’t have a router set-up).  I am a real safety freak, so I took this part very seriously.  I am really alone on all these projects, so your quick response to my hardware questions, etc. was a big confidence builder – like, I had a big brother that was just a email away!

7.  What are you planning on building next?

I am planning on building a second mirror/cabinet for above the first single vanity.  I have gained so much satisfaction from this project that I know I can do just about anything just taking it one step at a time.  Thanks again, John.

Thanks to Andrea for sharing this incredible home improvement project.  If you have a home improvement project that you’d like to share with our readers, shoot me an email: John at Our Home from Scratch dot com.

Posted in Carpentry,DIY Projects,Your Home from Scratch. Tagged in ,, , ,

Your Home from Scratch #3: Bobbi’s Sweet Router Table

Posted by on May 1st, 2014

In this week’s installment of Your Home from Scratch, we’re showing off Bobbi’s beautiful router table.  It’s perfect timing since we just released our own set of free router table plans, although my table isn’t even in the same ballpark as Bobbi’s.

custom router table

Bobbi is one of our newsletter subscribers and I was excited when she offered to share her finished project.  As part of this series, I asked Bobbi a bunch of questions about her table and her answers are below.

1.  What material did you use to build the router table?

The cabinet is 3/4” Baltic Birch plywood, the drawers are 1/2” Baltic Birch plywood, the top is 1-1/2” thick with a laminate on the top and bottom and edge banded in walnut and the drawer pulls are walnut.

router table side

2.  Did you work from a set of plans?

I took the Routers and Router Table class at Cerritos College (http://cms.cerritos.edu/woodworking/) and this was the design from the teacher.  We did work from his plans and instructions.

3.  How long did it take you to complete?

This was an 18 week class, meeting for four hours twice a week.  We would usually have an hour lecture/demonstration and then work on our tables.  At the end of the 18 weeks everyone had a completed router table.

router table 2

4.  What was the finishing process like, did you use polyurethane?

I chose to put a clear Shellac finish on my table, but most of the other students just left their’s raw wood. 

5.  How in the world did you make those drawer/door fronts and handles?

Ok, aren’t those drawer pulls just too cool?  I was so excited to get to make them.  Our instructor had four different jigs (the Jig & Fixtures class is another super great class at Cerritos College) that we used to make them.  Without pictures of the jigs, I could never begin to explain how we did it.  But, we used one jig with the oscillating spindle sander to make the finger pull in the plywood front and three different jigs at a router table to make the pulls.  It was surprisingly easy and fun.  Sorry, I can’t explain the process.

router bit drawers

6.  Have you had a chance to use it for any projects yet?  What home projects are you planning on using it for?

I’ve used the table many times and I get so excited every time I need to use it.  I made nightstands that required a lot of router work.  My next project is to remake some mirror closet doors.

night stand

7. Can anyone build a table like this or do you think the skills you needed were fairly advanced?

We had all levels of woodworkers in our class and everyone came out with a very nice router table.  I do think if someone was just given the plans to build on their own in their own shop they would probably need to be a fairly advanced woodworker.

Thanks to Bobbi for sharing this awesome router table.  If you have a home improvement or DIY project you’d like to share with our readers, just shoot me an email: John at ourhomefromscratch dot com.

 

Posted in Carpentry,DIY Projects,Your Home from Scratch. Tagged in ,, ,

Your Home from Scratch #1: Pottery Barn Inspired Media Console

Posted by on April 7th, 2014

While things have been going really well in our home office improvement project, I’ve been slacking on the blog lately.  Mudding the walls three nights a week will do that to you.  Since I’m too busy (and sore) to write a new post, I thought this would be a great opportunity to roll out a new series I’ve been planning on starting for some time.  It’s called YOUR Home from Scratch.  This is an opportunity for our friends, readers, subscribers and other bloggers to share their home improvement projects.

For our first edition, I’m excited to have Katie from Addicted 2 DIY.  Her and her husband recently completed work on a beautiful media console using plans from Anna White.  They modified the plans to make the console more appropriately sized for their space.  I used this post as an opportunity to ask Katie some questions to get some more details about her project.

Media Console

Q1. Beautiful piece.  Nice work.  You used plans from Ana White, but resized them for your own space.  Was that difficult?  How did you go about modifying plans?

Thank you.  Yes, we had to modify the plans to not only fit our space, but also because we used rough cut lumber.  Modifying the plans was not too hard.  I basically took the original plans and determined which cuts needed to be lengthened and wrote down my own cut list.  The hardest part was remembering to take into account that the larger wood dimensions would also affect the cut measurements.

rough cut lumber

Q2. You used rough cut lumber instead of S4S from your local big hardware store.  Was this the first time you worked with rough cut lumber?  How did you like it?

This was our first time using rough cut lumber for an entire project.  I used rough cut lumber to make a butcher block top for a kitchen island I built for my mother (http://addicted2diy.com/2013/11/21/how-to-build-your-own-butcher-block/), but it is entirely different to build an entire piece with it.  It was definitely a little more work for us, because we ripped all of the boards down ourselves, but I definitely love the look so much more.  Not only is the wood from a lumber store completely dry (therefore alleviating any shrinkage of the wood), but it just has so much more substance.  I love the larger dimension to it.

Q3. I’ve never worked with Alder.  How was it?  Looks similar to Pine or Poplar.  You needed to use the pre-stain conditioner?

Alder is awesome to work with.  It’s harder than pine, so we didn’t have to worry as much about dings and knicks if we accidentally dropped a piece or a tool on it.  Knotty alder is also very affordable and it takes stain very much like pine.  I did use wood conditioner on it as I do on all staining projects.  The color looks no different than the farmhouse table we built in our dining room (http://addicted2diy.com/2013/11/04/diy-farmhouse-table-with-extensions/).  We are definitely hooked on this species of wood and plan to use it for many other furniture projects in the future.

breadboard top

Q4. Love the breadboard top.  Any reason why you went with that look instead of the standard plywood with hardwood wrap?

We wanted the whole console to look as much like the original console I fell in love with in the Pottery Barn catalog.  The breadboard top also coordinates with the farmhouse and entry console tables we built.  We have an open floor plan, so you see all three of those pieces at the same time and we wanted to have a cohesive look.

Q5. It’s a substantial piece of furniture.  Is it a 2-person lift?

Yes!  It is definitely heavy.  I was actually a bit shocked at the weight, but my husband and I didn’t have too difficult of a time getting it into the house.

Q6. The original Pottery Barn piece is $1300.  How much did you end up saving by building this yourself?

We saved about $900 building this ourselves.  That includes all of the hardware and we splurged on the bubbled glass for the cabinet doors. Definitely a huge savings when you consider the size of the console and the wood we used.

Q7. Are you planning on building any other projects soon?  What’s in store for your home/blog?

I’m definitely planning other projects soon.  I really want to build some nice bedroom furniture for both of my boys.  Our house is always a work in progress and we’ve got plans to remodel our master bathroom hopefully in the near future.  I’ll definitely be sharing all of my tutorials and experiences on my blog.

Big thanks to Katie from Addicted 2 DIY for sharing her experience with this awesome furniture build.

If you are interested in sharing your own home improvement project, shoot me an email using the contact form with your project or idea.  You don’t need to be a blogger.

Posted in Carpentry,DIY Projects,Your Home from Scratch. Tagged in ,,

Free Built-In Cabinet Plans

Posted by on January 10th, 2014

Well, we’ve had another busy week.  Fortunately for you, we’ve been busy working on our next set of free woodworking plans.

free-built-in-cabinet-plans

These plans took FOREVER! I kinda went a little overboard too.  They’re more like an ebook than plans.  Complete with a material and tool list, step by step instructions, etc.  It’s more than 30 pages long!  The plans were based on our built-in cabinet series we made last year.

So how do you get access to these free built-in plans?  You subscribe to our free newsletter, that’s how.  The signup form is just to the left of this post.  Within minutes of signing up, you’ll get an email with a link to our plans page.  Sound good?

Posted in Carpentry,DIY Projects. Tagged in ,, , ,